Ebonie Alexander receives the 2022 Kingsbury Browne Conservation Leadership Award

The Land Trust Alliance presented Ebonie Alexander the distinguished Kingsbury Browne Conservation Leadership Award during Rally 2022: The National Land Conservation Conference.

By Corey Himrod September 17

The Land Trust Alliance, a national land conservation organization working to save the places people need and love by strengthening land conservation across America, presented Ebonie Alexander the distinguished Kingsbury Browne Conservation Leadership Award during Rally 2022: The National Land Conservation Conference.

The award honors those who have enriched the conservation community through their outstanding leadership, innovation and creativity in land conservation. Named for the conservationist who inspired the Alliance’s founding in 1982, the award ranks among the organization’s highest honors.

Ms. Alexander is the executive director of the Black Family Land Trust in Raleigh, North Carolina. She is the first person of color to serve on the board of the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, and currently sits on the board of the Virginia United Land Trusts — a coalition of land trusts in Virginia — as well as American Farmland Trust.

“Ebonie is a leader in a space where she had to be a true pioneer and innovator,” said Andrew Bowman, the Alliance’s president and CEO. “Those qualities have allowed her to be the driving force behind innovative programs and state policy changes in support of landowners who have historically been overlooked. She has moved land conservation beyond its traditional boundaries. And with this award and fellowship, Ebonie will continue to inspire us.”

Alexander will serve as the Kingsbury Browne Fellow for the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy for 2022-2023. Kingsbury Browne fellows engage in research, writing and mentoring, and facilitate a project that builds upon and shares their experience with the broader community.

“Ebonie Alexander is a remarkable and passionate leader in the vanguard of efforts to protect open space, working farms, and diverse cultural heritage for generations to come,” said Jim Levitt, director of the International Land Conservation Network at the Lincoln Institute. “We are very excited to get to know her, to work with her, and to share her insights with land trust colleagues from coastal Virginia to the Pacific highlands, and beyond.”